Showing posts with label Business Communication. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Business Communication. Show all posts

Saturday, April 20, 2013

First Person: I am a great boss because I am not your friend

Listening is one of the most important qualities any great boss should have. It is extremely important to have effective communication skills, especially in the workplace. Without communication in the workplace, there is no production, and without production, there is no success. I listen.

Below are some ways that I exemplify a great boss on a daily basis.


Macro-managing. Micromanaging embodies workplace bullying at its finest and is quite malicious. I am a great boss because I refuse to do it. In order to have an effective team, kicking someone when they are down is never the answer.

Empower and Empathize. I invest my time in empowering my team, not rejecting them. One of the most problematic issues that occur in workplaces today are that some leaders focus on being negative and critical. Since day one I believe the key to being a great leader is to have a strong decorum and ability to empathize with a worker.

Optimism. In order to be a great boss, one must be open-minded yet optimistic. Sure I possess self-awareness, as any effective leader should, but I am also relatively universal in terms of decision making and look at any situation fully rather than one dimensionally.

Encourage Strengths. It is important to recognize the strengths over the weaknesses. I believe in order to develop a successful team, you must recognize a worker's individual strength and morale.

Put out Fires Quickly. I believe in addressing problems instantaneously before they become a major issue. Without addressing the obvious problem before it turns into an even greater issue, you'll never find a real solution. It is important to extinguish the fire quick.

Love the Job. This is the key to being a great boss and leader. To possess the experience, education and skills to complete the job is one thing, but to actually love your job...well, that love triumphs everything. In order to be a great boss you have to love what you do or you're never going to be successful.

I am a great boss because I am not your friend. When it comes to establishing a strong work ethic with a team of hard workers, I never mix business with pleasure. When you are working, it should always be about business and nothing else.

Monday, May 14, 2007

How to deliver bad news for project managers

No one loves to hear bad news. Especially, if the news is something that makes a huge impact on your overall business and work ethic. In fact, you never know how an individual will react towards something that is "bad" or of a negative nature. Although delivering bad news is very hard because everyone is different and impossible to predict, it is something we must do if that person (in this case, project manager) is not working up to standard.

The important part of delivering bad news is simply "knowing" the person. If you know nothing about the project manager, including his/her work ethic and overall business contributions and benefits to the business, you need to simply find all of that out. Take sometime to separate the individual from his/her job and position, to focus on who this individual is as a person. If you haven't done so, it is also best to prepare yourself with questions you may expect the project manager to ask you. Perhaps, think of the most common and make sure you have an answer for them, because they may put you on the spot.

It's ok to be professional, but do not be afraid to be a little personal. The key is being impersonal, yet personal. This doesn't mean befriend them. This doesn't mean they must be your best friend. You want to find out what you can, because when you present them with bad news, you can use several alternatives in your method, involving things you know about them (good things that is) that will give them hope.

What kind of bad news are you delivering to the project manager?

When presenting bad news to project managers, it is best to be passive, yet alert, but also direct. It is important to use tact, no matter how they act because you are the professional and you are the person that has a standard to set. To react in a negative sense would be not only selfish, but rather foolish. You are also representing a company and therefore, should always respect the company you are representing.

After you deliver the bad news, it is best to tell them what they want to hear, without being personal. For instance, you used tact in your approach, now you need to sympathize, although empathy works best. Perhaps, think of something that occurred in your life and use that as an example of what it has done to improve your work ethic and overall stance. Give the project manager the same guidance and hope, as no hope should ever be lost.

Friday, March 9, 2007

How to develop an integrated project plan

In college, I've had the pleasure of learning more about integrated project plans than the average student quo. In fact, one of my first projects consisted of developing an integrated project plan for a make believe company. How did I do it?

I wrote down several ways to start a project. This could be anything from a visual module to an experiment based on surveys and statistics to actual ideas in chronological order based on importance and relevance. In fact, I refreshed myself with marketing knowledge and created a huge outline of project ideas, as ideas are the starting line. Lets face it, it is crucial to be a visionary in this world. I wrote down questions I would ask someone, in terms of projection and connection. In order to create an integrated plan, you must possess knowledge of any type of project you tend to use or the company tends to use, but you must be original and offer commentary to support your idea.

In order for any integrated project plan to be successful, one must understand the individuals functions and contributions of the project. It is extremely important to assign tasks (unless your goal is to complete a singular project with no help at all) to different individuals participating in the project. You want to decide who is in control (or who are, as it can be more than one person). You want to decide who is in charge of organizing the project, as well as, analyzing the advertising and promoting of the project. You also want to focus on who will be responsible for the presentation, as well as, questions asked by individuals who you will present this project to.

When creating each individual project, several important factors come into play. In fact, these things are truly relevant in terms of developing a successful integrated project plan. Some of them include: actual idea or subject of the project, cost of the project, the risk of the result of following the project, how much time devoted to the project, time to complete the project, the benefit of the project, and the overall effectiveness and quality of the project. This excludes what the end result will be.

After you discovered answers to the actual idea and subject, you want to work on the project itself including the end result. That includes the content, as well as, overall presentation. Focus on the idea you choose, instead of flopping onto another right away (in fact, starting off with one idea is highly recommended) and if that idea doesn't work or make any sense, move onto the next idea. As you continue, work on connecting with your project by sharing it with others.


Believe it or not, developing a successful integrated project plan is hard work. You want to make individuals believe what you say and be interested and motivated in your integrated project, as they are your audience and most of the time, your capital and/or funding which will support the project and allow it to grow.

Once you have finished, it's important to analyze your project leaving no stone unturned. Once your project is analyzed, it can be finalized with additional editing from a third party source. Finally, you can present it to the appropriate individuals.