Showing posts with label Business Skills. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Business Skills. Show all posts

Friday, October 5, 2007

Originality, the key factor that contributes to a successful business

So, I am sitting here thinking about what makes a business successful. When professionals refer to the purpose of a business, they believe that marketing and innovation are two very important provisions. Based on my experiences, I believe that these two very important formations of a business, integrate to form the ultimate macrocosm, making them radically important, as a result. However; in order to form the ultimate macrocosm, you must be an independent thinker that doesn't solely rely on concepts and individual philosophies, that have been repeated and/or are guaranteed to fail. You must also think ahead and think about what your consumer will want most.
 
Problems don't exist without creators. If these problems were created by us, then we also have the ability (and stability) to fix any trial and tribulation we are faced with. The world has a weakness and it is banality.  In order to sell a good and/or  a service and market it's strengths in a positive notion, one must create an innovation that is original and will benefit the consumer, as the consumer is the business. In addition to creating a product and/or service that can suit many people's needs, one must collaborate several individual factors that makeup a business and separate their tasks.
 
Although business is filled with an array of risk and expected concern, your goal is to not worry about whether a product and/or a service will triumph other innovations, let alone competition. Your goal is to find ways and means of allowing your innovation to succeed and develop, while catering to individual demographic. In order to create a successful product and/or a successful service, one must know their product/service inside and out, with the intent to deliver it on a professional wavelength, using a strict informative approach. You can make many promises, but if they don't sell, you have nothing. In my 26 years of living I have yet to see any logic that can really refute this particular mindset.
 
The statement that several business professionals believe that marketing and innovation are the two most important aspects of a business is not only applied to the advertising, selling, and delivering side of the business structure, but also determines those key elements as being the most important out of other significant factors. With that stated, I believe the most important key factor of a business that elaborates beyond the standard marketing and innovative quo, is originality.

Why? Because when you stand out, many people are going to be interested in you. Difference equals uniqueness. And the equation is like a domino effect and makes perfect sense - uniqueness equals success.
 

Thursday, May 17, 2007

What is a continuous improvement plan

The continuous improvement plan impacts all individual responsibilities of the business, but creates higher alternatives that can develop within the business. In order to make this or anything happen, it's a fact that individuals must be willing to contemplate the problematic issues and work through ways and means of fixing them. This can be anything from a standard evaluation of the overall organization that links directly to the problem to specific actions that can be taken to improve the business immediately from the problem. The continuous improvement plan is more than just evaluating and analyzing, as well as, organizing and planning, the continuous improvement plan is the future. It is a goal every business should aim to achieve and it represents evolution, transformation and change - for the better.

Every business is different and therefore; will use a variety of different continuous improvement plans, as a result. If you are an entrepreneur or a business (whether sole proprietorship, partnership, or corporation) chances are you will never settle for less than excellence. Does excellence exist? I think many would like to think so, so yes, it does. With the continuous improvement plan, you are destined to be on the road to excellence. Some people would love to settle in the beautiful cottage in the Paris with multiple waterfalls and peace, however; some people would rather have all of France.


Do you see the distinction?

If the business is doing well, you will want to maintain that level of performance and overall productivity. But like anything that is good, it doesn't mean it cannot be better. If the business is doing well, does it mean that your business is well? Absolutely not. The "If It's Broke, Don't Fix It" only applies to smaller things and is clearly hypothetical in this scenario. Businesses are big, whether sole proprietorship, partnership, or corporation. Like anything that exists today, there is always room for improvement to create something better, as a result. If the business is doing bad or poorly, you will want to improve the level of performance, as a result. This is where you put the continuous improvement plan to use and develop a keen likeness to the method.

Monday, May 14, 2007

How to deliver bad news for project managers

No one loves to hear bad news. Especially, if the news is something that makes a huge impact on your overall business and work ethic. In fact, you never know how an individual will react towards something that is "bad" or of a negative nature. Although delivering bad news is very hard because everyone is different and impossible to predict, it is something we must do if that person (in this case, project manager) is not working up to standard.

The important part of delivering bad news is simply "knowing" the person. If you know nothing about the project manager, including his/her work ethic and overall business contributions and benefits to the business, you need to simply find all of that out. Take sometime to separate the individual from his/her job and position, to focus on who this individual is as a person. If you haven't done so, it is also best to prepare yourself with questions you may expect the project manager to ask you. Perhaps, think of the most common and make sure you have an answer for them, because they may put you on the spot.

It's ok to be professional, but do not be afraid to be a little personal. The key is being impersonal, yet personal. This doesn't mean befriend them. This doesn't mean they must be your best friend. You want to find out what you can, because when you present them with bad news, you can use several alternatives in your method, involving things you know about them (good things that is) that will give them hope.

What kind of bad news are you delivering to the project manager?

When presenting bad news to project managers, it is best to be passive, yet alert, but also direct. It is important to use tact, no matter how they act because you are the professional and you are the person that has a standard to set. To react in a negative sense would be not only selfish, but rather foolish. You are also representing a company and therefore, should always respect the company you are representing.

After you deliver the bad news, it is best to tell them what they want to hear, without being personal. For instance, you used tact in your approach, now you need to sympathize, although empathy works best. Perhaps, think of something that occurred in your life and use that as an example of what it has done to improve your work ethic and overall stance. Give the project manager the same guidance and hope, as no hope should ever be lost.

Friday, March 9, 2007

How to develop an integrated project plan

In college, I've had the pleasure of learning more about integrated project plans than the average student quo. In fact, one of my first projects consisted of developing an integrated project plan for a make believe company. How did I do it?

I wrote down several ways to start a project. This could be anything from a visual module to an experiment based on surveys and statistics to actual ideas in chronological order based on importance and relevance. In fact, I refreshed myself with marketing knowledge and created a huge outline of project ideas, as ideas are the starting line. Lets face it, it is crucial to be a visionary in this world. I wrote down questions I would ask someone, in terms of projection and connection. In order to create an integrated plan, you must possess knowledge of any type of project you tend to use or the company tends to use, but you must be original and offer commentary to support your idea.

In order for any integrated project plan to be successful, one must understand the individuals functions and contributions of the project. It is extremely important to assign tasks (unless your goal is to complete a singular project with no help at all) to different individuals participating in the project. You want to decide who is in control (or who are, as it can be more than one person). You want to decide who is in charge of organizing the project, as well as, analyzing the advertising and promoting of the project. You also want to focus on who will be responsible for the presentation, as well as, questions asked by individuals who you will present this project to.

When creating each individual project, several important factors come into play. In fact, these things are truly relevant in terms of developing a successful integrated project plan. Some of them include: actual idea or subject of the project, cost of the project, the risk of the result of following the project, how much time devoted to the project, time to complete the project, the benefit of the project, and the overall effectiveness and quality of the project. This excludes what the end result will be.

After you discovered answers to the actual idea and subject, you want to work on the project itself including the end result. That includes the content, as well as, overall presentation. Focus on the idea you choose, instead of flopping onto another right away (in fact, starting off with one idea is highly recommended) and if that idea doesn't work or make any sense, move onto the next idea. As you continue, work on connecting with your project by sharing it with others.


Believe it or not, developing a successful integrated project plan is hard work. You want to make individuals believe what you say and be interested and motivated in your integrated project, as they are your audience and most of the time, your capital and/or funding which will support the project and allow it to grow.

Once you have finished, it's important to analyze your project leaving no stone unturned. Once your project is analyzed, it can be finalized with additional editing from a third party source. Finally, you can present it to the appropriate individuals.

Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Overcoming the fear of selling

For many of you the fear of selling anything is a huge challenge and obstacle for you from day to day. The first thing you need to do is find out exactly what it is you're afraid of. It is crucial to identify what is holding you back.

Are you afraid of success? Believe it or not there is an actual fear of success, as with success comes consequences and sometimes those are extremely hard to endure let alone deal with. Are you afraid of failure or rejection? Everyone gets rejected as everyone has failed at something. Does that mean to not try and to stop? Giving up is as good as losing, as not trying is basically losing already. This leads me to the question - do you fear being perceived as being pushy or persistent? You shouldn't care what others think of you, as it is your work that will do the talking. Do you fear that your product may not meet the expectations of your customer? There are billions of people on this planet. There will be many who love your work, some who will hate it, but in the end those who appreciate it will be those who are willing to help you grow.

The fact is, you can't come up with a solution if you don't know what the problem is. There's a huge misconception in direct sales being that you think you're 'imposing' on your friends, family or just a customer in general. As long as you feel as though you're imposing...you are. You need to love your product and feel as though you are offering a service. You're filling a need not a want and in the end, you need to be true to yourself and your product, as the rest will sell itself.

The reality is this - people are natural-born sellers. We just don't realize it when we're not making money from it. Let's say you go to a movie that you loved. And you have a friend who would enjoy it too. Wouldn't you recommend it to him/her?

So why is it that as soon as we go into sales we automatically feel as though we can’t recommend the products we sell? Especially if we possess knowledge about them and are confident about them. Wouldn't you want to recommend those to others? Why is it that we tend to feel guilty because we’re going to make a profit off of it?

If you are one that has a fear of selling, take some time today to figure out the cause of your fear, and take action to fix it. Don't think hypothetically, think practically. It is that simple.