Friday, March 9, 2007

How to develop an integrated project plan

In college, I've had the pleasure of learning more about integrated project plans than the average student quo. In fact, one of my first projects consisted of developing an integrated project plan for a make believe company. How did I do it?

I wrote down several ways to start a project. This could be anything from a visual module to an experiment based on surveys and statistics to actual ideas in chronological order based on importance and relevance. In fact, I refreshed myself with marketing knowledge and created a huge outline of project ideas, as ideas are the starting line. Lets face it, it is crucial to be a visionary in this world. I wrote down questions I would ask someone, in terms of projection and connection. In order to create an integrated plan, you must possess knowledge of any type of project you tend to use or the company tends to use, but you must be original and offer commentary to support your idea.

In order for any integrated project plan to be successful, one must understand the individuals functions and contributions of the project. It is extremely important to assign tasks (unless your goal is to complete a singular project with no help at all) to different individuals participating in the project. You want to decide who is in control (or who are, as it can be more than one person). You want to decide who is in charge of organizing the project, as well as, analyzing the advertising and promoting of the project. You also want to focus on who will be responsible for the presentation, as well as, questions asked by individuals who you will present this project to.

When creating each individual project, several important factors come into play. In fact, these things are truly relevant in terms of developing a successful integrated project plan. Some of them include: actual idea or subject of the project, cost of the project, the risk of the result of following the project, how much time devoted to the project, time to complete the project, the benefit of the project, and the overall effectiveness and quality of the project. This excludes what the end result will be.

After you discovered answers to the actual idea and subject, you want to work on the project itself including the end result. That includes the content, as well as, overall presentation. Focus on the idea you choose, instead of flopping onto another right away (in fact, starting off with one idea is highly recommended) and if that idea doesn't work or make any sense, move onto the next idea. As you continue, work on connecting with your project by sharing it with others.


Believe it or not, developing a successful integrated project plan is hard work. You want to make individuals believe what you say and be interested and motivated in your integrated project, as they are your audience and most of the time, your capital and/or funding which will support the project and allow it to grow.

Once you have finished, it's important to analyze your project leaving no stone unturned. Once your project is analyzed, it can be finalized with additional editing from a third party source. Finally, you can present it to the appropriate individuals.

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